{Travel} Low Light Photography. 24hrs in Newquay, Cornwall. Part 2

In yesterday’s post I shared the daytime pictures from my short 24 hour break to Newquay. During the day I walked, and walked and walked so much that I had to throw my flip-flops away when I got back to Brighton. They were worn through!

Late afternoon I grabbed something to eat and then took my can of ginger beer and sat on the beach.
Just me, alone with my camera and my thoughts.

I love this time of day as everything looks “healthy”. Everything looks shiny and golden. The view from where I sat was surreal.

I knew I had but an hour to make the most of the available light and so I got my tripod out and started to set up for my evening shots. Taking pictures with a slow shutter speed is incredibly fun. The most important part, for me, is that I don’t even breathe on my camera once I’ve clicked the shutter button. It’s tricky, especially when the tripod is in moving water and I know that if a wave crashes just a bit too hard against it, not only will my picture be ruined, but it could also bump over my camera and then that’s a whole other story, including waves of tears. So as I sit there, knee deep in water, my jeans covered in sand and my camera strap around my neck (just in case!) I try my best to stop breathing for however long the shutter is left open. If the camera moves, your picture(s) will end up looking like this spooky looking thing:

What happens is that when you click the button to take the picture, the camera opens the part that allows the light in, for longer than normal. So rather than hearing that click-click! sound that you normally would when you take a picture, you will hear:

click!………………………………………………………..1 Mississippi…………………………………………………………..
2 Mississippi…………………………………………………………………………..3 Mississippi……………………………….
……………………don’t.dare.to. breathe………………………………………………………………………………………………….
4 Mississippi…………………………………………………………………………………………..click!

So even when it’s dark outside, you could still get light pictures, the trick is to make sure that nothing in front of the camera is moving (aside from water for example) and that the camera itself is completely steady. If you don’t have a tripod, or a wireless remote, place your camera on a rock or something and set the self timer. This way, the camera can capture as much detail (in the dark/low light) of anything that is static.

In this case the waves were crashing against the rocks, and rather than “freezing” the movement of the waves, the slow shutter allowed the waves to show movement thus making it appear silky and smooth. Combine that with the warm glow of the sunset, and the rocks appear to be covered in liquid gold.

Patience = Photographic Gold.

I LOVE IT!

Even if you have a handy, point-and-shoot camera you could try to do the same. If you need help with the settings, just shout and I’ll try to help out.

Without further ado, here they are…

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